Philosophy means ‘the love of wisdom’, whilst ethics thinks about what is right and wrong and what should be done in certain situations.

We consider various religious beliefs; both from the major world religions and from less well established belief systems. By considering different ethical issues and events, we apply these various beliefs.

Philosophy & Ethics Department

NameInitialsE-mailTelephone
Ms Bernadette HewisonBHbhewison@nunthorpe.co.uk01642 310561 ext.1034
Mr Andrew DevlinAPDadevlin@nunthorpe.co.uk01642 310561 ext.1034
Ms Hermione Jackson HJhjackson@nunthorpe.co.uk01642 304550 ext.3003
Miss Amelia O'ByrneAOaobyrne@nunthorpe.co.uk01642 310561 ext.1034

Year 6 Transition

During Year 6 transition, students begin studying Philosophy & Ethics with ‘Hinduism’.

Key stage 3

Philosophy & Ethics is delivered in Years 7, 8 and 9 at Key Stage 3.

Year 7

Autumn Spring Summer
Hinduism and Sikhism Christianity and Islam Conflict and Creation

Year 8

Autumn Spring Summer
Judaism and Prejudice & Discrimination Holocaust and Humanism Alternative Beliefs and Buddhism

Year 9

Autumn Spring Summer
Religion in the Media and Issues Issues and Ethics Big Questions

Scheme of Work

The scheme of work which will be used at KS3 can be found here.

Key Stage 4

Studying Philosophy & Ethics is optional, and students have selected to carry on with their studies from Key Stage Three. The focus of this GCSE is to give students the knowledge of how to deal with moral dilemmas and issues that affect them and society in general. The GCSE also looks at religious teachings and examples of how other people deal with situations.

The examining body

Philosophy & Ethics follows the AQA specification A (8062). The following website details will take you to the resources pages for this qualification: AQA | Religious Studies | GCSE.

The weighting of the topics in the exam are as follows:

  • Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teachings and practices (1 hr 45 mins- 50%);
  • Component 2: Thematic studies (1 hr 45 mins- 50%).

Timetabling

Students have three lessons per week and study the subject for two years (years 10 & 11).

Extra Support

From April to May, revision sessions are offered either as drop in sessions for one-to-one help or in a more structured format. Dates will be publicised well in advance to students.

Assessment arrangements

Year 10

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Religion and Life, and Christianity Christianity, and Relationship and Families Relationships and Families, and Hinduism

Year 11

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Hinduism, and Peace and Conflict Peace and Conflict, and Crime and Punishment Crime and Punishment, and Revision

Scheme of Work

The scheme of work which will be used at KS4 can be found here.

Key stage 5

This course requires you to have an enquiring mind, an interest in religion and a desire to examine some of the biggest questions in the universe!
What you do not need is a religious belief (though it’s fine if you do have one). It is NOT a course for training would-be monks and nuns. Nor do you need to have GCSE in Religious Studies, though you do need a good grade at English.

You will need to be able to read quite challenging texts, take notes, discuss and argue, examine a range of different issues and write a good examination answer!
You will study three main areas throughout the course:

  • Philosophy of Religion;
  • Ethics;
  • Hinduism.

If you go on to do the full A Level from the AS qualification you can study these subject areas at a more advanced level.
Philosophy and Ethics is designed to encourage you to do the following:

  • Investigate, study and interpret significant religious, philosophical and ethical issues;
  • Think rigorously and present widely informed and detailed arguments with well-substantiated conclusions;
  • Reflect on, express and justify your opinions;
  • Relate your study to issues in the wider world;
  • Know and understand key concepts – including beliefs, teachings, the contribution of significant people, religious language, major issues and doctrines and how these are expressed in texts;
  • Interpret and evaluate religious concepts, ideas, arguments and the views of scholars.

Hopefully, your A Level studies will be more than a means to an end for you. This subject has something extra – real ‘value added’ features:

  • exploring the mysteries of human existence;
  • analysing and evaluating the views of others and substantiating your own;
  • being challenged to seek answers to the mysteries of life and death;
  • looking at such issues as ‘Does God exist?’ and ‘What happens when we die?’;
  • testing the views of others, including scholars, challenging the evidence and the testimonies;
  • being aware of the historical, social and cultural influences on the way ideas have developed and of how the past influences the future;
  • facing the challenge of exploring questions that have no answers.

If you want to go on to study the subject at university, there is a huge range of courses available, including Philosophy, Ethics, Theology, Biblical Studies, Abrahamic Religions, Islamic Studies, Jewish Studies, World Religions and Anthropology. Other related degrees favouring Religious Studies Advanced level include History, Law, Medicine, Psychology, Social Policy, Social Work and Education.

Year 12

Learners must study all three components.

Component 1: An Introduction to the Study of Religion – Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
This component offers the choice of the study of one religion. We have chosen Hinduism
There will be four themes:

  • religious figures and sacred texts;
  • religious concepts;
  • religious life;
  • religious practices.

Learners will be expected to answer two essay questions: one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three.

Component 2: An Introduction to Philosophy of Religion – Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Philosophy of Religion

There will be four themes within this component:

  • inductive arguments for the existence of God;
  • deductive arguments for the existence of God;
  • challenges to religious belief – the problem of evil and suffering;
  • religious experience.

Learners will be expected to answer two essay questions: one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three.

Component 3: An Introduction to Religion and Ethics – Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
Religion and Ethics

There will be four themes within this component (including applied ethics in themes two to four):

  • Ethical thought;
  • Aquinas’ Natural Law;
  • Fletcher’s Situation Ethics;
  • Utilitarianism.

Learners will be expected to answer two essay questions: one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three.

Year 13

Learners must study all three components.

Component 1: An Introduction to the Study of Religion – Written examination: 2 hours
This component offers the choice of the study of one religion. We have chosen Hinduism
There will be four themes:

  • religious figures and sacred texts;
  • religious concepts and religious life;
  • significant social and historical developments in religious thought;
  • religious practices that shape religious identity.

Learners will be expected to answer two essay questions: one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three.

Component 2: An Introduction to Philosophy of Religion – Written examination: 2 hours
Philosophy of Religion

There will be four themes within this component:

  • arguments for the existence of God;
  • challenges to religious belief;
  • religious experience;
  • religious language.

Learners will be expected to answer two essay questions: one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three.

Component 3: An Introduction to Religion and Ethics – Written examination: 2 hours
Religion and Ethics

There will be four themes within this component (including applied ethics in themes two to four):

  • Ethical thought;
  • Deontological Ethics;
  • Teleological Ethics;
  • Determinism and Free will.

Learners will be expected to answer two essay questions: one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three.

Scheme of Work

The scheme of work which will be used at KS5 can be found here.